A square image of a Viburnum x rhytidophylloides 'Allegheny' shrub growing in the garden with bright red drupes, pictured in sunshine.

25 of the Best Viburnum Varieties

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1. Allegheny

V. x rhytidophylloides ‘Allegheny’ is a hybrid cultivar that has fragrant white blossoms with raised yellow anthers for a fuzzy look. It grows in Zones 5 to 8.

Called a “leatherleaf” variety, the foliage is deeply creased with veins for a textured, leather-like appearance.

‘Allegheny’

Bright red drupes mature to black. Height and width maxes out at eight to 10 feet.

‘Allegheny’ is available from Nature Hills Nursery.

2. American Cranberrybush

American cranberrybush, V. opulus var. americanum, (formerly V. trilobum) is known best for its edible red drupes.

It’s a native shrub for Zones 2 to 7 that grows to mature dimensions of eight to 12 feet tall and wide.

The flowers are snow white. Deciduous leaves turn burgundy, orange, scarlet, and yellow before dropping in the fall.

A square image of an American cranberrybush growing in the garden in bright sunshine.

American Cranberrybush

Wet soil is no problem as this species grows in bogs in the wild.

American cranberrybush is available from Nature Hills Nursery.

3. American Spice

American Spice™, V. x burkwoodii ‘Duvone,’ was a surprise “sport” of hybrid cultivar V. x burkwoodii ‘Sarcoxie.’

It is more compact and fragrant than ‘Sarcoxie,’ and it keeps its leaves longer.

This cultivar is suitable for growing in Zones 5 to 9.

The flowers are pink in the bud stage and open to reveal white blooms with a delightful clove-like scent.

A close up square image of the green leaves and white flowers of American Spice viburnum growing in the garden surrounded by a layer of mulch.

American Spice

In the warmest regions, the leaves may remain evergreen. Elsewhere, fall foliage is a rainbow of reds, yellows, and oranges well into winter. Red berries deepen to black.

Expect a mature height of four to five feet with an equal spread.

American Spice™ is available from Nature Hills Nursery.

4. Arrowwood

Native arrowwood, V. dentatum, has a history of use by Indigenous Americans to make straight and sturdy arrows.

It’s suited to cultivation in Zones 2 to 8 where it matures to dimensions of six to 15 feet tall and wide.

Creamy white blossoms adorn the branches of V. dentatum in springtime. Bluish-black drupes nestle among the multicolored fall foliage.

A close up of the blue berries and green foliage of arrowwood viburnum outdoors in the garden.

Arrowwood

These plants are tolerant of clay soil.

Three- to four-feet bare roots are available from Nature Hills Nursery.

5. Brandywine

Suited to Zones 5 to 9, Brandywine ™ viburnum, (aka V. nudum ‘Bulk’) is a cultivated variety of the native species V. nudum, commonly referred to as possumhaw viburnum or smooth witherod.

Instead of growing five to 12 feet tall like the species plant, it achieves a compact height and width of five to six feet max.

Fragrant, flat blossoms are white with elongated yellow anthers for a fuzzy look.

Autumn foliage may blaze red and deep purple. Richly hued pink and blue drupes accent the spectacular display.

A close up of bright red and deep purple drupes growing on a viburnum shrub pictured on a soft focus background.

Brandywine

This cultivar has a high tolerance for wet soils.

Brandywine™ plants are available from Nature Hills in #3 containers.

6. Burkwood

Burkwood, V. x burkwoodii, is a hybrid suited to Zones 5 to 8.

A cross between V. carlesii and V. utile, Burkwood viburnum is named after nurserymen Arthur and Albert Burkwood, who were responsible for the hybridization in 1924.

Unlike many white varieties, the blossoms do not have elongated anthers and a fuzzy appearance. Instead, they are tubular, white, and almost wax-like.

A close up square image of the white flowers of Burkwood viburnum pictured outdoors on a soft focus background.

Burkwood

Leaves bronze to reds and purples in the fall and are accompanied by red drupes ripening to black.

Expect a mature height of six to eight feet and width of five to seven feet.

Burkwood is available in #5 containers from Nature Hills Nursery.

7. Cayuga

Fragrant hybrid cultivar V. x carlcephalum ‘Cayuga’ has pink buds that gradually shade to tubular white blossoms. It’s best suited to Zones 5 to 8.

In the fall, the green, leather-like foliage is a deep purple. Sparse red berries highlight the autumn display.

A close up square image of the light pink flowers of 'Cayuga,' a cultivar of Viburnum x carlcephalum, a hybrid species.

Cayuga

Expect mature dimensions of four to eight feet tall and six to eight feet wide.

Cayuga is available from Nature Hills in #3 containers.

8. David

David, V. davidii, is a low-profile sweetheart with a mature height of only two to three feet and width of three to four feet. It does best in Zones 7 to 9.

The blossoms start as pink buds and open to reveal white blooms in an arrangement of flat-topped clusters. 

A square image of the bright green leaves and deep purple drupes of a David viburnum.

David

In Zone 9, the leathery, blue-green leaves are evergreen. In Zones 7 and 8, expect them to deepen to a rich burgundy. Pink drupes shade to red before turning a striking turquoise-blue.

The modest proportions of this species make it well-suited to container gardening.

David is available in #2 containers from Nature Hills Nursery.

9. Dawn

V. x bodnantense ‘Dawn’ is a cultivar of the Bodnant viburnum, a hybrid cross between V. farreri, a fragrant Chinese species, and V. grandiflorum, a fragrant Himalayan species.

It is prized for having clusters of sweetly-scented pink blossoms that shade light and dark for depth and visual appeal, and is suited to cultivation in Zones 5 to 8.

A close up horizontal image of the light pink and white flowers of Viburnum bodnantense ‘Dawn’ pictured on a soft focus background.
‘Dawn.’ Photo credit: JC Raulston Arboretum at NC State University.

This cultivar reaches a mature height of eight to 10 feet and spreads four to six feet wide. 

A characteristic to note is that in the warmest regions, flowers bloom from fall to spring on leafless cinnamon-colored stems.

Emergent green foliage has red stems.

Fall foliage shades to red and burgundy with red drupes that deepen to black.

10. Emerald Triumph

V. x ‘Emerald Triumph’ is a hybrid cross of V. x rhytidophylloides ‘Allegheny’ and V. burejaeticum, or Manchurian viburnum, a white-flowered Chinese species.

Clusters of white blossoms have a fuzzy appearance created by long stamens with yellow anthers. 

The leaves are leather-like and blue-green. In the warmest locations within their range, they remain green.

In cooler climes, deep red leaves and red drupes that darken to black spark fall-to-winter interest.

A square image of 'Emerald Triumph' growing outdoors with deep green foliage and red and black drupes.

‘Emerald Triumph’

Mature plants are six to eight feet tall and wide, and they can tolerate clay soil.

‘Emerald Triumph’ is available from Nature Hills Nursery.

11. European Snowball

European snowball, V. opulus ‘Roseum’ has a tree-like growth habit and does well in Zones 3 to 8.

V. opulus, aka the European cranberrybush is considered invasive in parts of the US, but this is a sterile cultivar that produces no berries.

It has green flowers that mature to white and fade to pink. They are arranged in round clusters and resemble those of a mophead hydrangea.

A square image of the white, rounded flowers of snowball viburnum pictured on a soft focus background.

European Snowball

The leaves turn red and orange in the fall.

Expect mature heights and widths of 10 to 12 feet.

European snowball is available from Nature Hills.

12. Forest Rouge

Forest Rouge®, V. prunifolium ‘McKRouge,’ is a native blackhaw cultivar with shiny maroon autumn foliage and blueish-black berries. It grows in Zones 4 to 8.

Spring foliage is yellow-green with striking red stems, deepening to dark green as they mature.

A square picture of Forest Rouge blackhaw viburnum growing by the side of a road.

Forest Rouge

Flat clusters of creamy white blossoms have yellow anthers for a fuzzy look.

Mature dimensions are eight to 10 feet tall and six to eight feet wide.

Forest Rouge® is available from Nature Hills Nursery in #5 containers.

13. Judd

Judd, V. × juddii, is a hybrid cross between V. carlesii, Korean spice, and V. bitchiuense, Bitchiu. Both are highly fragrant. 

This sweet/spicy scented species is suited to cultivation in Zones 4 to 8.

Rounded clusters of pink buds open into waxy white blossoms. Autumn foliage shades to reds and purples accented by drupes that deepen from red to black.

A close up of the flowers of a judd viburnum with green leaves in soft focus in the background.

Judd

Expect mature dimensions of six to eight feet tall and six to 10 feet wide.

This hybrid tolerates occasional drought.

Judd is available from Nature Hills.

14. Korean Spice

Korean spice or V. carlesii, sometimes written as Koreanspice, is one of the most fragrant species, with a spicy-sweet vanilla aroma.

It is suited to cultivation in Zones 5 to 9 and is widely hybridized for its exceptional qualities.

Spring is peak viewing time when rounded clusters of red buds open to display waxy pink blossoms.

The fall color palette includes dark reds and burgundies with red berries ripening to black that are not as showy as those of some varieties.

A square image of Korean spice flowers pictured in bright sunshine on a dark soft focus background.

Korean Spice

Mature dimensions are four to six feet tall and four to seven feet wide.

This species is tolerant of juglone.

Korean spice is available in two-gallon containers from FastGrowingTrees.com.

15. Lantana

Lantana, V. lantana, aka the wayfaring tree, grows as a shrub or multi-stemmed tree and is suited to Zones 4 to 7.

V. lantana is considered invasive in Illinois, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. It’s a vigorous grower and if left unchecked, can quickly spread outside of its planting area.

The flowers are creamy white with prominent stamens and yellow anthers, and bloom in flat clusters at the ends of the upright branches.

A close up of the flattened flower heads of lantana viburnum growing in the garden pictured on a soft focus background.

Lantana

In autumn, the grayish-green foliage shades to purples and reds, and there may be red drupes that deepen to black.

Mature dimensions are 10 to 15 feet tall and wide. This species is tolerant of drought and alkaline soil.

Lantana is available from Nature Hills.

16. Lantanaphyllum

Lantanaphyllum, V. x rhytidophylloides, is a compact variety that sports bright red drupe at summer’s end and is perfect for Zones 5 to 8.

It’s a cross between V. rhytidophyllum and V. lantana.

Flat-topped spring flowers are creamy white with elongated stamens and yellow anthers. 

The foliage is semi-evergreen, often remaining green until early winter. Drupes are red ripening to black.

Mature dimensions are eight to 10 feet tall and wide.

‘Allegheny,’ mentioned above, is a cultivar of this hybrid species.

17. Laurustinus

Laurustinus, V. tinus, is an evergreen shrub or tree for Zones 8 to 10. Glossy dark green foliage and pink buds are a welcome sight in late winter to early spring.

This plant is considered invasive in Oregon.

The buds open into masses of pleasantly fragrant white blossoms. In the fall, clusters of metallic blue drupes suspended from reddish stems punctuate the dark green foliage.

A close up square image of lauristinus flowers pictured in bright sunshine on a dark soft focus background.

Lauristinus

Mature dimensions are six to 12 feet tall and five to 10 feet wide.

This species has some salt and drought tolerance. It’s also suitable for planting in slightly alkaline soil, clay, and sand.

Lauristinus is available from Nature Hills.

18. Mapleleaf

Mapleleaf, V. acerifolium, is a native species that grows well in Zones 3 to 8. It is suited to large container gardening, with mature dimensions of six feet tall and two to four feet wide.

A close up horizontal image of the foliage and drupes of a mapleleaf viburnum pictured on a soft focus background.
Mapleleaf.

The species lives up to its name with mapleleaf-shaped foliage that shades to burgundy in the fall. Coupled with deep blue berries, it is an end-of-season spectacle.

This species is tolerant of deep shade and dry soil.

19. Mohican

V. lantana ‘Mohican’ is best known for having a spectacular month-long display of orange-red drupes that appear in midsummer.

This cultivar boasts flat-topped clusters of creamy white blossoms with yellow anthers. It is well-suited to Zones 4 to 8.

A square image of a large Viburnum lantana 'Mohican' shrub with white flowers growing in the garden.

‘Mohican’

Mature heights are between six and eight feet. Widths may range from six to 10 feet.

‘Mohican’ is available from Nature Hills Nursery.

20. Nannyberry

Appreciated for its long-lasting blue-black autumn berries, nannyberry, V. lentago, grows in Zones 2 to 8.

Like the blackhaw, nannyberry grows as either a shrub or small tree. Shrubs are typically 14 to 16 feet tall and six to 12 feet wide at maturity. Small trees may reach 30 feet.

A close up square image of the flowers of a nannyberry shrub pictured in light sunshine on a dark background.

Nannyberry

The flowers are white with prominent anthers. Autumn leaves are multi-hued with red berries that deepen to blue-black.

You can find two- to three-foot bare roots available at Nature Hills Nursery.

21. Onondaga

V. sargentii ‘Onondaga’ is suited to Zones 4 to 7. Maroon-tinged foliage emerges in the spring and gradually shades to green.

The eye-catching flowers resemble those of a lacecap hydrangea, with a ring of white blooms surrounding a center of maroon buds.

A close up square image of Viburnum sargentii 'Onondaga' growing in the garden pictured in bright sunshine.

‘Onondaga’

Red drupes complement the red autumn foliage.

Expect a mature height and width of six to eight feet. This cultivar prefers full sun.

‘Onondaga’ is available from Nature Hills Nursery.

22. Raspberry Tart

Raspberry Tart™, aka V. dentatum ‘Rastzam’ is so-named for having raspberry red fall foliage. It is a cultivated variety of native arrowwood viburnum that is suited to Zones 3 to 9.

Spring and summer foliage is glossy green. Flat-top clusters of white blossoms grace the tips of the branches in spring, and blue-black drupes follow at season’s end.

A close up square image of the red foliage of Viburnum dentatum 'Raspberry Tart' pictured in light sunshine on a soft focus background.

Raspberry Tart

Mature dimensions are a modest four to five feet tall and wide.

This cultivar tolerates drought, salt, and wet soil.

Raspberry Tart™ is available from Nature Hills

23. Shasta

V. plicatum f. tomentosum ‘Shasta,’ a double-file viburnum cultivar, grows in Zones 5 to 8.

It has flattened lacecap blooms lining the tiered horizontal branches for a rich, layered look.

The blossoms are white. Green foliage may shade to deep reds and purples as summer shifts to fall. Red berries ripen to black.

A square image of the leaves and flowers of 'Shasta' double-file viburnum shrub.

‘Shasta’

Mature dimensions are six to eight feet tall and eight to 12 feet wide.

Note that this species is considered invasive in Pennsylvania.

‘Shasta’ double-file is available from Nature Hills.

24. Summer Magic

V. prunifolium ‘Summer Magic’ is a cultivated variety of blackhaw viburnum for Zones 4 to 9. It has exceptional foliage. The leaves start out pink and deepen to red and then green as they mature.

Blackhaw is a native species with an irregular shape cultivated as multi-branched shrubs or small trees.

Shrub heights are 12 to 15 feet tall and ten to 12 feet wide. Small trees may reach 30 feet.

A close up of a small 'Summer Magic' shrub growing in a pot at a plant nursery.

‘Summer Magic’

The flowers are white. The leaves turn red and yellow in the fall and drupe production is minimal.

‘Summer Magic’ blackhaw is available from Nature Hills in #3 containers.

25. Wabi-Sabi

Wabi-Sabi®, V. plicatum var. tomentosum ‘SMNVPTFD,’ is a double-file cultivar suited to Zones 5 to 8.

It is a distinctly different type of viburnum. The blossoms are like a lacecap, but with large and small white flowers scattered randomly, for a playful, informal look.

Shrubs achieve a mature height of two to three feet and a width of three to four feet, making them appropriate for container gardening.

A close up of the lacecap-like flower of Wabi-Sabi viburnum pictured on a dark background.

Wabi-Sabi

The foliage is evergreen in warmer regions and shades to reds and purples in cooler climes. Bright red berries top off this winner.

Wabi-Sabi® is available from Nature Hills.

Cottage Garden Charm

With 25 types of viburnum from which to choose, it’s time to get out the garden planner and choose one or more full sun to part shade locations for displaying your new favorites.

A close up horizontal image of the colorful fall foliage and red drupes of a viburnum shrub.

Use your new woody shrubs to create a delightful garden scheme with flouncy blooms and lush greenery.

Add fragrant species and cultivars for a sweet/spicy aroma, and snow-white flowering types that glow dreamily beneath the moonlight.

Choose flora with similar cultural requirements to accompany your viburnum, including:

Viburnums make exceptional stand-alone specimens, informal hedges, and cottage garden companions.

Do you grow viburnum? Tell us about your favorites in the comments section below.

If you enjoyed this roundup and would like to learn more about growing viburnum, we recommend the following guides next:



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